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Financial Assistance For Those With Down Syndrome

January 30, 2011
Everyone could use a little extra money to care for the ones they love

Everyone could use a little extra money to care for the ones they love

Today, the United States’ unemployment rate stands around 9 percent and families from coast to coast are struggling to make ends meet. But for those caring for someone with Down syndrome, budgets can be even tighter.

To help those caring for someone with Down syndrome, or any developmental disability, here are three places to look for financial assistance.

1. U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA)

When caring for a child, under the age of 18, with Down syndrome, Supplemental Security Income payments (SSI) from the SSA may be available. Adults with Down syndrome may also be eligible for additional income. For those over the age of 18 these are called Social Security Disability Insurance benefits (SSDI). According to the SSA’s website the following criteria must be met in order to receive SSI or SSDI for 2011.

  • The child must not be working and earning more than $1,000 a month in 2011 (This earnings amount usually changes every year).
  • The child must have a physical or mental condition, or a combination of conditions, that results in “marked and severe functional limitations.” This means that the condition(s) must seriously limit your child’s activities.
  • The child’s condition(s) must have lasted, or be expected to last, at least 12 months; or must be expected to result in death.

2. Disability.gov

Federal grants for small business, non-profit organizations and individuals can be found on Disability.gov. This website, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, provides information on multiple federal agencies willing to offer financial assistance for education, health care, housing and more.  Agencies listed include:

3. Go Local

People and places within local communities can often provide assistance, both financial and instructive. Local places of worship frequently have funding available for members in need of financial assistance.

Aldermen and city council members can provide instructive assistance. Within the U.S. aldermen and city council members are appointed to lead a specific district or city. Aldermen and city council members can connect those with Down syndrome, and their families, towards organizations willing to help financially.

*Photo provided by Mangpages Flicker account via Creativecommons.org

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